How Do I Contest a Will?
Will contest

How Do I Contest a Will?

The ways that children of a first marriage can contest a will fall into several scenarios. However, in order to do so, a person must have “standing.” Typically, a person has standing in two situations, explains nj.com in its recent article, “Can children from a first marriage contest a will?”

One way is when the individual is the decedent’s heir at law and would inherit under the laws of intestacy if the will were declared invalid. Another way a person could have standing, is if there were a prior will in which the person is a named beneficiary, and the prior will would be reinstated, if the subsequent will were set aside.

For example, in Mississippi, probate laws take blended families into consideration. If a person dies without a will and has descendants, like children or grandchildren who are not descendants of the surviving spouse, then several things would happen. The surviving spouse would inherit a child’s share of the estate. The descendants from outside the marriage would then inherit the remainder of the estate in equal shares.

Let’s say George and Gracie were married and had baby Benny. After George and Gracie divorce, George marries Phyllis. If George dies intestate—without a will—then Benny would inherit one-half of his estate. If George dies with a will, Benny has standing to challenge the validity of the will.

As a practical matter, Benny should only challenge the will, if he’d stand to inherit more under intestacy than under the will, and he has a valid challenge justifying that the will be set aside.

The four most common challenges to a will are lack of capacity, improper execution, fraud and undue influence/duress.

It’s not uncommon for will contests to be successful. However, it really depends on the facts and circumstances of each specific case. For example, Benny would have a much tougher time proving undue influence, if John and Phyllis were similar in age and married for 30 years prior to George’s death, than if Phyllis was 50 years younger than George, and he had some level of dementia.

Reference: nj.com (December 11, 2018) “Can children from a first marriage contest a will?”

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Proper Estate Planning Can Prevent Family Fights

Research shows that about 60% of U.S. adults don’t have a will.

However, not all of your possessions pass through a will. 401(k)s, life insurance proceeds, pensions, and annuities pass by beneficiary designation.

The (Washington, PA) Observer-Reporter’s recent article, “Improper estate planning can lead to familial conflict” explains that some of your possessions will pass through probate. If you own property in several states, the process could become more difficult for your loved ones. A way to simplify the process for them, is by having an updated will.

For instance, even if your will states that all of your possessions are to be split equally between your two children, this may not be what actually occurs. If your life insurance lists only Bob as the beneficiary, he’ll walk off with 100% of the death benefit. Your younger son Doug will receive only half of the assets that don’t have a beneficiary designation. Assets that pass by designation are not controlled by the will. That is why Bob gets all the money from the insurance. As you can see, it’s vital that you review your accounts’ beneficiary designations regularly, to make certain they’re up to date. Check on them every few years or when there’s a family divorce, birth, or death. Once you’re gone, they can’t be changed.

In addition, your estate plan should include two powers of attorney (POA). The first POA is to make health decisions. The second POA is to make financial decisions, if you don’t have the capacity to do so. Your POA agent has your authority to make decisions, only when you do not have capacity and she can only exercise it for your own benefit. POAs end at the drafter’s death.

It’s common today for families to have blended elements. Many people were married before and may have had children. Here’s an example of a famous father who made his third wife executor of his estate, giving her control of his business. In this case, his equally famous son was the principal player in the father’s business. The son didn’t understand the implications of his father’s estate plan. When the father died, there was a long and expensive legal battle between the son and the third wife.

Who was it? It was Dale Earnhardt Jr.

Work with an experienced attorney and don’t let this happen to your family.

Reference: The (Washington, PA) Observer-Reporter (December 7, 2018) “Improper estate planning can lead to familial conflict”

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Can I Contest a Will?

When a person contests a will, they’re arguing that the will isn’t valid. A will can be contested because an individual claims that the deceased person didn’t possess the required capacity to make a will, was unduly influenced or insane, made a more recent will, or there was fraud, duress or forgery. A will can also be contested because it contains technical flaws.

The Carroll County (MD) Times’ article, “Contesting a will is difficult; only an ‘interested party’ is eligible,” explains that to be eligible to contest a will in Maryland, you must be an “interested party.” This means you’re named in the will or would have been eligible to inherit by law, if the deceased hadn’t written a will.

In Mississippi, contested wills are heard by the Chancery Court.  Chancellors are tasked with hearing and deciding contested cases. They direct the actions of personal representatives (executors) and pass orders for administering an estate.

The person contesting a will has the burden of proof, meaning that she must show that the will isn’t valid. Other interested parties aren’t required to prove that the document is valid, but they may be called to testify, if they were present or involved when the deceased person made the will or signed and executed it.

Make no mistake: challenging a will is difficult. Courts regard a will as an expression of the deceased person’s wishes, and since he’s not around to tell the court, “No, that’s not what I meant,” judges are hesitant to make changes in the will as written.

This is a good reminder to be certain your will says what you want it to say. If it doesn’t, work with a qualified estate planning attorney to have revisions made or codicils (additions that modify or explain provisions in the will) added to reflect your intent accurately.

If a will is successfully contested, the estate is then treated as if the deceased died without a will or intestate. This doesn’t guarantee that the challenger will get some of the estate, because it’s based on where she is in the line of succession set out in state intestacy laws. If a person dies without a will, priority in the distribution of his estate will be as follows in Mississippi:

  • First, to the children and the descendant’s of children who died prior to the deceased individual (Under Mississippi’s laws of intestacy, a spouse is treated like a child as far as his or her share of the estate is concerned);
  • Second, to the decedent’s father, mother, brothers, sisters, and descendants of brothers and sisters who predeceased the deceased individual;
  • Third, to the grandparents and uncles and aunts.

If none of the relatives listed above exists, succession continues to any blood relatives of the highest degree defined by Mississippi law.

In the event there’s no qualifying relative, the estate goes to the State of Mississippi.  If the deceased was on Medicaid, the assets of the deceased may be required to be paid to the State of Mississippi Division of Medicaid.

Reference: Carroll County (MD) Times (November 23, 2018) “Contesting a will is difficult; only an ‘interested party’ is eligible”

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