How Does a Life Estate Work?

Life estates are used for a number of estate planning purposes. However, the most frequent strategy is to use a life estate where a parent transfers a home to a child and retains a life estate for themselves.

nj.com’s recent article, “How does a life estate work to transfer a home to a child?” explains that as a result of the transfer, the child becomes the owner of the home but the parent has certain rights and responsibilities.

The most critical right retained with a life estate is the exclusive right to reside in the property. A child cannot force the parent to move out, and likewise, the child doesn’t have any right to live there. The child can live with their parent, but the deed doesn’t give the child the legal right to live there.

With a life estate, the parent must pay the property taxes and all the regular maintenance connected to the property. Typically, the life tenant is responsible for repairs—but not improvements.

This can be hard to determine, but usually the life tenant must maintain the property in the same condition as when the life estate deed was signed. So, if the parent moves out, and the property is rented, the parent has the right to receive all of the rents.

When the parent passes away, the life estate automatically ceases, and the child now has all of the rights associated with the property.

As far as income tax, when the parent dies, the property receives a “step up” in basis to the date of death value. If the property is sold after the parent dies, the capital gain or loss is calculated by deducting the date of death value from the sales price. It’s a very important tax advantage if the parent has owned the home for a long time, and the property has a low basis.

Retaining the life estate can help the child avoid the capital gains tax more effectively than just transferring the property outright to the child.

However, in contrast, if the property is sold while the parent is still alive, part of the proceeds will be allocated to the parent and part will be allocated to the child.

Only the percentage that’s allocated to the parent will be excluded from income under the federal tax laws. The part that’s allocated to the child may be subject to capital gains taxation.

Every family’s situation is different, so it would be wise to speak with an estate planning attorney to explore whether or not a life estate would be the best situation for you and your family.

Call us (228) 460-5243 or email us at info@perklawgroup.com to find our how your estate planning attorney can help you.

Legal disclaimer: The information in this article is provided for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. Your should not act or refrain from acting on the basis of any content included in this article or on our website (www.perklwagroup.com) without seeking legal or professional advice.

Reference: nj.com (July 12, 2019) “How does a life estate work to transfer a home to a child?”

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What’s the Latest with Tom Petty’s Estate?
DEL MAR, CALIFORNIA - SEPTEMBER 17: Tom Petty performs in concert on the third day of KAABOO Del Mar on September 17, 2017 in Del Mar, California. (Photo by Gary Miller/Getty Images)

What’s the Latest with Tom Petty’s Estate?

The late Tom Petty’s wife, Dana Petty, has asked a Los Angeles judge for permission to fund the LLC Tom Petty Legacy with the singer’s assets. However, his two daughters object.

Billboard reports in a recent article, “Tom Petty’s Widow Files New Appeals Against Daughters in Escalating Battle Over Late Rocker’s Trust” that Dana asked the court to deny a previous petition filed by daughter Adria demanding that Dana immediately fund Petty Unlimited. This is an LLC created to receive assets (a.k.a. “artistic property”) from Petty’s trust. Instead, Dana wants to fund and execute an operating agreement for Tom Petty Legacy, a separate LLC that she created by herself.

Adria’s petition accused Dana of withholding Petty’s assets from Petty Unlimited to keep her and sister Annakim from “participat[ing] equally” in the management of those assets, as directed in the trust. Adria also said that under the terms of the trust, Dana was required to fund Petty Unlimited within six months of Petty’s death. However, she failed to meet that deadline.

Dana claims that she’s the “sole successor trustee” of Petty’s trust and she’s “exclusively authorized” to form any entity of her choosing to be the beneficiary of her husband’s assets—provided all three women are given equal participation in its management. She claims that the trust doesn’t specify Petty Unlimited as the only entity that can receive the assets. As such, the LLC has no legal rights to them.

Dana claims there’s been “foul behavior” on Adria’s part, stating that the 44-year-old has “caused enormous damage to many of Tom’s professional relationships” via a series of letters (allegedly sent by Adria’s lawyer Alex Weingarten) that “threaten[ed] everyone whom Tom worked with for decades: his record labels, his music lawyer David Altschul…even Tom’s longtime accountant.” Dana says the threats led the attorney, who was then representing her, to resign. She also claims Adria has been “abusive” and “slander[ous]” towards several others, including his longtime business manager Bernie Gudvi, his estate planning attorney Burton Mitchell and members of his band the Heartbreakers.

Dana accused the daughters of interfering in and, in some cases, delaying the release of several posthumous releases of Petty’s music. She says that as trustee of Petty’s trust, she is sole owner of Petty Unlimited, and that Adria and Annakim (and by extension their lawyers) have been “masquerading” as its rightful representatives. The petition notes that Dana has since signed documents to remove Adria and Annakim as managers of the LLC and “fired” a law firm as its representative.

The petition acknowledged that equal participation in the management of Petty’s assets between the three is required under the terms of the trust, but that Dana has sole power to decide on a governing structure for the entity that’s eventually funded with those assets. Now that negotiations with Adria and Annakim have broken down, Dana is trying to assert her “broad discretion” in deciding that structure without their input.

In response to Dana’s claims, Adria and Annakim’s lawyer Alex Weingarten told Billboard, “Dana and her lawyer are basing their case on smoke and mirrors. Every claim they make is demonstrably false. Adria and Annakim are laser focused on one thing—honoring and protecting their father’s legacy and enforcing the terms of his trust, as written.”

Petty died of an accidental drug overdose in October 2017, at the age of 66.

Reference: Billboard (May 30, 2019) “Tom Petty’s Widow Files New Appeals Against Daughters in Escalating Battle Over Late Rocker’s Trust”

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What Should I Keep in Mind in Estate Planning as a Single Parent?

Every estate planning conversation eventually comes to center upon the children, regardless of whether they’re still young or adults.

Talk to a qualified estate planning attorney and let him or her know your overall perspective about your children, and what you see as their capabilities and limitations. This information can frequently determine whether you restrict their access to funds and how long those limitations should be in place, in the event you’re no longer around.

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Will Contests May Be Rare, but They Do Happen

In an ideal world, wills and estate plans are created when people are sound of mind and body, just as the familiar legal phrase describes. The best way to avoid a will contest is to have a well-written will, prepared by a qualified estate planning attorney who can help avoid legal contest. However, there are times when this is not the case, says The Huntsville Item in the article “Legal Corner: Will contests while rare are messy.”

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An Estate Plan Directs Assets According to Your Wishes
IRA, Pension, 401k and House

An Estate Plan Directs Assets According to Your Wishes

Anyone who has any assets they want distributed should have an estate plan, regardless of the size of their estate. Having a will and an estate plan created by an experienced attorney is the easiest place to start, says the Observer-Reporter in the article “Set up an estate plan so your assets go where you want.” Without a will, the state will decide what happens to your assets, and it may not be what you wanted.

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Don’t Make These Estate Planning Basic Mistakes

Yes, death is the ultimate grim topic. However, it is an important one to discuss with your loved ones and your estate planning attorney. If you don’t have an estate plan in place, and one that is done correctly, you may doom your family to spending years and more money than you’d want on court proceedings and legal fees to settle your estate. You can prevent all this, by creating an estate plan with a qualified estate planning attorney. It is really that simple, says The San Diego Union-Tribune in the article “6 estate-planning mistakes to avoid.”

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How Can I Goof Up My Estate Plan?

There are several critical errors you can make that will render an estate plan invalid. Many of these can be easily avoided, by examining your plan periodically and keeping it up to date.

Investopedia’s article, “5 Ways to Mess Up Estate Planning” gives us a list of these common issues.

Not Updating Beneficiary Designations. Be certain those to whom you intend to leave your assets are clearly named on the proper forms. Whenever there’s a life change, update your financial, retirement, and insurance accounts and policies, as well as your estate planning documents.

Forgetting Key Legal Documents. Revocable living trusts are the primary vehicle used to keep some assets from probate. However, having only trusts without a will can be a mistake—the will is the document where you designate the guardian of your minor children, if something should happen to you and/or your spouse.

Bad Recordkeeping. Leaving a mess is a headache. Your family won’t like having to spend time and effort finding, organizing and locating your assets. Draft a letter of instruction that tells your executor where everything is located, the names and contact information of your banker, broker, insurance agent, financial planner, attorney etc.. Make a list of the financial websites you use with their login information, so your accounts can be accessed.

Faulty Communication. Telling your heirs about your plans can be made easier with a simple letter of explanation that states your intentions, or even tells them why you changed your mind about something. This could help give them some closure or peace of mind, even though it has no legal authority.

Not Creating a Plan. This last one is one of the most common. There are plenty of stories of extremely wealthy people who lose most, if not all, of their estate to court fees and legal costs, because they didn’t have an estate plan.

These are just a few of the common estate planning errors that happen. For more information on how to be certain your assets will be dispersed according to your wishes, talk with a qualified estate planning attorney.

Reference: Investopedia (September 30, 2018) “5 Ways to Mess Up Estate Planning”

 

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Why Do I Need Estate Planning If I’m Not Rich?

Many people spend more time planning a vacation than they do thinking about who will inherit their assets after they pass away. Although estate planning isn’t an enjoyable activity, without it, you don’t get to direct who gets everything for which you’ve worked so hard.

Investopedia asks you to consider these four reasons why you should have an estate plan to avoid potentially devastating results for your heirs in its article “4 Reasons Estate Planning Is So Important.”

Wealth Won’t Go to Unintended Beneficiaries. Estate planning may have been once considered something only rich people needed, but that’s changed. Everyone now needs to plan for when something happens to a family’s breadwinner(s). The primary part of estate planning is naming heirs for your assets. Without an estate plan, the courts will decide who will receive your property.

Protection for Families With Young Children. If you are the parent of small children, you need to have a will to ensure that your children are taken care of. You can designate their guardians, if both parents die before the children turn 18. Without a will and guardianship clause, a judge will decide this important issue.

Avoid Taxes. Estate planning is also about protecting your loved ones from the IRS. Estate planning is transferring assets to your family, with an attempt to create the smallest tax burden for them as possible. A little estate planning can reduce much or even all of their federal and state estate taxes or state inheritance taxes. There are also ways to reduce the income tax beneficiaries might have to pay. However, without an estate plan, the amount your heirs will owe the government could be substantial.

No Family Fighting (or Very Little). One sibling may believe she deserves more than another. This type of fighting can turn ugly and end up in court, pitting family members against each other. However, an estate plan enables you to choose who controls your finances and assets, if you become mentally incapacitated or after you die. It also will go a long way towards settling any family conflict and ensuring that your assets are handled in the way you wanted.

To protect your assets and your loved ones when you no longer can do it, you’ll need an estate plan. Without one, your family could see large tax burdens, and the courts could say how your assets are divided, or even who will care for your children.

Reference: Investopedia (May 25, 2018) “4 Reasons Estate Planning Is So Important”

 

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