What Debts Must Be Paid Before and After Probate?

Everything that must be addressed in settling an estate becomes more complicated, when there is no will and no estate planning has taken place before the person dies. Debts are a particular area of concern for the estate and the executor. What has to be paid, and who gets paid first? These are explained in the article “Dealing with Debts and Mortgages in Probate” from The Balance.

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How To Keep Your Financial Resolutions in 2019

New Year’s Resolutions: we all make them but keeping them is another story. About 30% of all Americans plan on making financial resolutions for the year ahead, reports CNBC in the article “The secret to keeping next year’s financial resolutions.”

Getting more specific, most of the 2,000 people surveyed by Fidelity said they were going to save an extra $200 a month for their long-term 2019 goals, like retirement, college costs and health care. Half said they were going to boost contributions to their retirement savings plans, usually a 401(k) or their IRA. Higher limits for contributions to both are expected to increase the savings rate.

The unexpected ups and downs of life could stand in the way of your resolutions. Rising costs of health care, the volatile stock market and concerns about the trade wars are on most people’s minds. Try to focus on what you can do, rather than what you cannot control.

Like most of us, the people surveyed also admitted to making some spending mistakes they know made their savings less than they wanted. Chief among them: eating out too often and splurging on things that are way out of their budget.

How can you be sure to make and keep your financial New Year’s resolutions in 2019?

Try a budgeting app. There are several well-known, tried and tested budgeting apps that make keeping an eye on your spending and finding costs to cut easier. Once you’ve identified places you can cut spending and created a surplus, put that money into your savings account. Or, increase your retirement plan contribution. Even a little bit, can make a big difference over time.

Can you do better with your savings interest rate? Rising interest rates may make it possible to get a better return in 2019. As the Fed has raised its benchmark rate, yields on savings accounts are on the rise. While many savings accounts are only averaging 0.2%, some high-yield accounts are at 2.25%. Consider switching to a bank that offers at least a 2% return.

Note that the opposite goes for your credit cards: rising interest rates mean you’ll want to pay those off as soon as you can. Today’s average credit card interest rate is more than 17%. Try to pay the balance in full every month to avoid paying any more in fees than necessary.

Take control of your health care costs. If your Health Savings Account permits, increase the amount of money you contribute to your plan. If you didn’t use up all your funds in 2018, make an appointment for mid-year 2019 to schedule appointments or procedures you know you’ll need before the year is out. Make a resolution not to throw away health care dollars in 2019, especially if you have a “use-it-or-lose-it” flexible spending account.

Reference: CNBC (Dec. 15, 2018) “The secret to keeping next year’s financial resolutions”

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